Prescription Sunglasses for Golf (Progressives/Bifocals)?

I started another thread here yesterday about wanting better vision on the course than my Guess clip-ons. Originally thought Oakley was the way to go (and that was the topic of my thread) but after a bit more research, the G30 filter everyone recommended is not available in their progressive offerings. In fact they have a very narrow and expensive ($400-500 lenses only) list of choices when it comes to progressives, and I actually prefer bifocals.
So... for the dual sighted here, what lenses did you go with, and why?
I have an appointment on Thursday to get the ball rolling on these so I would appreciate as much feedback as possible before than.
As always... Thanks.
-ss
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It sounds like you are planning to purchase a golf specific pair of glasses. Why is it so important to you to have a multifocal lens? I would suggest foregoing the progressive lens and get distance only. You aren't going out to the course to read Tolstoy, why bother with the distortion and blur a progressive lens will induce as you address the ball. A flat top bifocal will be as bad if not worse. If you insist on having a multi-focal lens (presumably to study your scorecard, generally not a positive for your game), the optician needs to drop the height of the BF/PAL seg as much as possible. If you are getting a PAL your Doctor needs to increase your add power to compensate for the lower PAL height. I would strongly recommend single vision shades for golf. If a frustrating near vision blur problem presents itself, break out your everyday multifocals, get your reading done, then put your shades back on and play!
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hey there i see your dilema and Im not sure if you have ever heard of CLARK HOWARD consumer guru from Atlanta. he has a national radio show and does TV in the local market. back to the glasses, Clark buys his glasses from the following website. The glasses start at $8.00 for complete pair of glasses. Now for the progressive bifocals they are really reasonable starting at $25.00 and $37.00 Some come with polarized clip on shades also. I think you should examine the site and with the info that you recieve from the exam give them a shot. In comparison to the prices you would have to pay seems like a no lose situation. Clark Howard raves about his and so have many other of his listeners. I will be buying a pair in September just to try them out. Sorry i dont have a personal experience yet but i would trust Clark. Hundreds of frames from stainless steel to memory titanium CHECK THEM OUT.
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It sounds like you are planning to purchase a golf specific pair of glasses. Why is it so important to you to have a multifocal lens? I would suggest foregoing the progressive lens and get distance only. You aren't going out to the course to read Tolstoy, why bother with the distortion and blur a progressive lens will induce as you address the ball. A flat top bifocal will be as bad if not worse. If you insist on having a multi-focal lens (presumably to study your scorecard, generally not a positive for your game), the optician needs to drop the height of the BF/PAL seg as much as possible. If you are getting a PAL your Doctor needs to increase your add power to compensate for the lower PAL height. I would strongly recommend single vision shades for golf. If a frustrating near vision blur problem presents itself, break out your everyday multifocals, get your reading done, then put your shades back on and play!
I wear bifocals but have trouble playing golf with them as described above. So my golf sunglasses are single vision.
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hey there i see your dilema and Im not sure if you have ever heard of CLARK HOWARD consumer guru from Atlanta. he has a national radio show and does TV in the local market. back to the glasses, Clark buys his glasses from the following website. The glasses start at $8.00 for complete pair of glasses. Now for the progressive bifocals they are really reasonable starting at $25.00 and $37.00 Some come with polarized clip on shades also. I think you should examine the site and with the info that you recieve from the exam give them a shot. In comparison to the prices you would have to pay seems like a no lose situation. Clark Howard raves about his and so have many other of his listeners. I will be buying a pair in September just to try them out. Sorry i dont have a personal experience yet but i would trust Clark. Hundreds of frames from stainless steel to memory titanium CHECK THEM OUT.
I would be wary of mail order multi-focal lenses, particularly if you order progressives addition lenses. In a progressive lens design, the bottom nasal and bottom temporal portions have pronounced aspheric curves to allow for a diagonally shaped clear channel of increasing plus power converging nasally. This lens, more than any other, is sensitive to being cut specifically for the distance between your pupils, and the distance from the bottom of the frame and the bottom of your pupil vs. limbus depending on the lens manufacturer. Flat top bifocals also require precise fitting, although to a lesser degree. Additionally, the stronger the lens power the more important it becomes for precise measurements. Decentered lenses induce prismatic image decentration, higher powers placed inaccurately induce more prismatic image moevment, resulting in blur, fatigue, reduced stereopsis, and possibly double vision if the error is profound. I am not sure how much I would trust Clark, listen to your Doctor.
With regard to the type of sunglass lens for golf, I usually recommend skipping polarizing filters for golf. They are unnecessary, more expensive, and possibly distracting. Polarized glasses are great for boating and fishing, generally not need for driving and golf. I recommend, and personally prefer contrast enhancing amber tints for golf, they really make the greens pop.
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All great feedback... thank you. A couple of observations that may help:
I do not have an issue with the bifocals; the reading part does not get in the way. My biggest gripes with the current set up are:
1.) Very low contrast with the dark grey clip ons. Hard to track the ball when the sun is not behind me. Hard to read greens.
2.) The frames do not wrap around and I am constantly shading both sides with my hands to get rid of the glare coming in from the sides. Hard to read greens.
3.) reflection and glare between the two lenses (corrected and clip ons) which helps contribute even more to the problems in 1 and 2 above.
4.) When I sweat, they slide down my nose at address. Also, perspiration inevitably drips between the two lenses and I have to take them apart and wipe off four surfaces. Just plain hard to deal with. Always fiddling with them in hot weather.
I did consider a single vision pair, but I would not be able to read the numbers on my GPS, let alone the scorecard, so I came away with it not being an option since the bifocal has not been an issue. Plus I don't really want to have to manage two sets of i-ware on the course.
Golfsll... I did check out Zenni, and a number of other generic online shops with good reps, but did not find the kind of wrap-around sunglass type frames I am really looking for. These sport frames are also designed to address the problems caused by perspiration as well (ventilation and grip). So I am really trying to find the right type of lens tint to put into whatever frames I decide on (the Oakleys are still the front runner in this regard)... plus would feel more comfortable getting them from my doctor's shop, and am willing to pay a reasonable premium to do so.
A couple of other folks mentioned that the new Younger Optics DriveWears are great for golf even though they are a polarized lens. Anybody seen these before?
Edit: I just found this on the DriveWears...
Looks interesting.
Answers:
It sounds like you are planning to purchase a golf specific pair of glasses. Why is it so important to you to have a multifocal lens? I would suggest foregoing the progressive lens and get distance only. You aren't going out to the course to read Tolstoy, why bother with the distortion and blur a progressive lens will induce as you address the ball. A flat top bifocal will be as bad if not worse. If you insist on having a multi-focal lens (presumably to study your scorecard, generally not a positive for your game), the optician needs to drop the height of the BF/PAL seg as much as possible. If you are getting a PAL your Doctor needs to increase your add power to compensate for the lower PAL height. I would strongly recommend single vision shades for golf. If a frustrating near vision blur problem presents itself, break out your everyday multifocals, get your reading done, then put your shades back on and play!
It is a HUGE, GIGANTIC pain in the butt to not be able to read on the golf course. You can't read the scorecard (hole distances), you can't see the hole description pictures printed on scorecards, you can't see course routing diagrams, you can't read yardage books, you can't read local rule sheets or pin sheets, you can't inspect your golf ball for damage or see the ball number clearly. I do have single vision sunglasses and keep some readers with me. It is a 4 hour annoyance to have to keep taking the readers on and off to see different things. And if you have to screw around with other gear (like on a rainy day), it gets worse. Trying playing fast when you're screwing around with all that crap.
I have been looking for solutions to this for several years. I had my doc write an Rx for occupational bifocals, where the reader section is at the top. But so far, I haven't been able to find a sunglass maker who can produce these.
I recently got two things that may help. One is a credit card sized magnifier. It is very thin and can easily be carried with a scorecard or yardage book. I have not tried it on the course, but it looks promising.
The other thing is a set of stick-on lenses that turn non-Rx sunglasses into readers. I haven't worked with these yet, but my plan is to trim these and put them at the top of my sunglasses to create my own occupational bifocals.
Some of my friends are able to play in progressives--more power to them. But I can't hit the ball or line up putts when I wear them.
Believe me, not being able to see things closely is a very real problem on the course.
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good guys, american made, I have the Dolomites.- for a big head
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good guys, american made, I have the Dolomites.- for a big head
Nico... do you have these in a dual vision Rx?
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THere is a bifocal made that has distance vision in the entire lens in both eyes and in one eye there is a small add power segment off to the side and down off the visual axis that is perfect for and made golf. Ask your eye doc about it because he will surly know about it. With this lens there is no messing with seg heights or progressive lenses that frustrate the golfer.
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In other words...for golfing purposes dont go with the Progressive Addition Lens. That should be the last choice.
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i said this in the other thread, but i'll repeat it here:
I love my bifocal contacts.
they work like a charm, and I can buy any sunglass i like.
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Clothier,
I saw your comment about the BF contacts. I am not sure I could ever wear them as the whole idea of them just make the hair on the back of my neck stand up (c;
But what I have read is that quite a number of folks have problems getting them to work, others take weeks or months getting used to them.
Did you just pop in the BF's and they were good to go? or was there a learning curve?
Do you have to look way up when you're at a computer? I spend alot of time in front of one and I switch from the BF's to computer glasses as I would have to crane my neck to see with the BF's.
-ss
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i've worn contacts for about 20 yrs. I'm 46.
There was a little break-in ( i learned walking out of the dr's office not to look down at steps, they'll be out of focus, you have to move your head to look down at first, it's not an issue any more.)
but that was true when I was wearing my bifocal glasses as well, I'd say the learning curve was about the same when I wore the glasses or the contacts, it's just different, and it takes some time to get used to it. I think I was good to go after about 2 weeks.
it's worth a shot. Most OD's will give you a trial pair for free and you can wear them for a couple weeks or so to see what you think.
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i'm eaither out on the sales floor or sitting at my desk, so I spend a fair amopunt of time looking at me screen, and I have a hard time keeping everything in focus when I wear my glasses to work, no issues at all with the contacts.
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i said this in the other thread, but i'll repeat it here:
I love my bifocal contacts.
they work like a charm, and I can buy any sunglass i like.
OK... you got me goin' here. I'll try and get a free sample tomorrow (if my Rx will allow). Just curious what lenses you're so happy with. B&L Pure Vision? Accuvue? or some GP offering?
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I have no idea what brand they are.
I'll check when I go home tonight.
I think they are B&L, but I wouldn't bet one of my kids on that.
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If you want a pair of glasses for all around use, you should try looking at the Adidas Performance Optics line. The model I wear is a790 (don't know if they still make it) and it works for everything...for all day and golf use. Heck, I even wear them in the gym. They don't slip down your nose when you sweat and they are extremely lightweight.
I bought them primarily for golf, but they are so comfortable I wear them all the time. I also have Transition lenses in them so I don't need that annoying clip on thing. I have the medium Transistions so they don't go as dark as regular sunglasses, but perfect for me. You can also get ones that go really dark, but I thought it would hinder my green reading.
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i said this in the other thread, but i'll repeat it here:
I love my bifocal contacts.
they work like a charm, and I can buy any sunglass i like.
OK... you got me goin' here. I'll try and get a free sample tomorrow (if my Rx will allow). Just curious what lenses you're so happy with. B&L Pure Vision? Accuvue? or some GP offering?
solutions or clothier, do either of you have an update on this topic. Late last year, I purchased a set of transistion progressives. I have been playing golf in progressive lenses for almost 10 years now, and haven't had any real problems, or maybe I do and that's why I'm a 16 HC and would be a 6 if I didn't
In anycase they have suited me fine, but I am considering getting just a regular pair of presciption non progressive sunglasses just for golf. I'm thinking this might make it more simple. I did read the comments from someone who mentioned all the things you don't think about needing the reading aspect for such as numbers on the balls, yardage on the scorecard (I have a skycaddie and even without my glasses I can read the number ok).
So I was just wondering if there are any more updates to this topic.
Thanks.
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I would also throw Synergeyes Multifocal in the mix. Best combination between optics and comfort!