Housing on the Golf Course?

I am an aspiring golf blogger (shamless plug: ), and wrote a piece on a new golf construction built around a community. That got me thinking, what are general opinions on this? I personally do not live on a golf course, but almost always play courses that are littered with them.
I think they are a novel idea, but are getting carried away. A local course near my house is filled with townhouses lining about 10 holes. I find these to be more annoying than a single-family home, as there is a largely increased chance that someone will be in their backyard making lots of noise. The other day on this course, there was a father mowing his yard perhaps 10 yards away from the tee box, and he was having a shouting match with his son about who was going to rake the clippings. These are most certainly instances where residential golf courses can be more of a nuisance.
I'd be curious to hear opinions of others...obviously expect those who live on golf courses to have opinions different from those who don't.
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Certainly not all golf course homes are created equal. But, in general I would not want to live on a golf course. The idea of a different group of 4 people coming through my "back yard" every 8-10 minutes does not sound appealing. I wouldn't mind living in a "golf community" where I would walk to the course to play or practice. I just don't want my backyard to bethe course itself.
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I would agree. I'd like to someday live in a townhouse in a golf community, but not be a part of the course, lol.
Plus, I always feel badly whenever I land either on or close to the private property.
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living in Florida I have forgotton what its like to play on a golf course that doesn't have houses on it and off almost every fairway.
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I'm the opposite. Would like to have a backyard that was at least close to a hole. But thats because I work from home and would be outside all the time sneaking in a hole or two lol
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If you like to have your kids using the "F"word and wearing helmet to play in the backyard.
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I've played several courses with housing around the course. It depends, for the most part it doesn't bother me, although it's a little weird playing in someone's backyard. The only time I've had problems are when the course seems to be built around the housing and not the other way around where people are actively walking around outside near the fairways and greens that become distracting
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I don't mind it at all actually, especially if the houses are impressive. At a place like Tartan Fields in Dublin, Ohio, the staggering collection of million-dollar homes can be distracting, though. That place is incredible. I would go back to Reynolds Plantation again just to ogle the houses.
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I don't prefer to play courses that are "littered" with houses, either. One of the most memorable experiences I had with this was at April Sound CC. The houses on that course were so close the the tee boxes/fairways/greens that I had a hard time focusing all day. On one hole in particular, the tee box is surrounded by houses on three sides. I swear the back doors to these houses were no further than 10 yards away from where we were hitting. The echo of the 460 cc drivers was almost deafening! I couldn't imagine trying to sleep in one Sunday morning with 4 driver cracks sounding off every 10-15 minutes!
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having houses on the course is a deal breaker for me. i absolutely hate it and won't play there, or won't come back anyway.
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It is an unfortunate economic reality that most new golf course development is driven by real estate. The quality of the course typically is secondary, they are built to sell houses. In these projects, the better land and views go to the lots and the course is left to be crammed in wherever there is a few leftover acres. The worst are the ones with single fairways routed between rows of homes with OB on both sides and long green to tee stretches that make cart riding almost a requirement.
I live in Phoenix, where about 95% of the courses are part of housing developments. Many are awful but some are well done. I do recognize that without the real estate component, a lot less new courses would be built.
I've come to appreciate the course with a core routing without housing intrusion and while I prefer to play this type of layout, I also like to play new and different courses which means I do see a lot of real estate golf.
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Having lived on a golf course, I can tell you that it is nice. Do you sacrifice a few things, yes. I of course lived just off a tee box so the chances of my house being in the way was very minimal but did I hear the mowers early on a Saturday morning sometimes, yes. Was I already up anyways, pretty much. Did I hear the occasional clang of an SQ460. Of course, and it sounds just as bad when you are laying in bed. Did I know this before purchasing the home, of course.
What is so nice? Well you constantly have a manicured area behind your house. Do some developers not heed the golf course designers and try and cram more real estate in by encroaching on the golf course, of course they do. They are in the business of making money.
There are lots of pros and cons. In my opinion, depending on house location on the course, the pros outweigh the cons.
What I find funny is the attitude of people who live in a golf course community and especially those who live on the course. There is not a single law on the books that I am aware of that requires the golfer to repair private property that lines a golf course when it is struck by an errant shot. This is a misnomer. There is no legal precedent for the home owner. Unless the house existed before the golf course. Which is rare. I of course laugh at those who run out onto a course and demand payment for a broken window or damaged siding. Have I ever been in this situation, no. Have I seen it occur, of course. Before you buy a home in a golf course community, know the law and what is enforceable. I am now off my soap box. Sorry for the rant.
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I don't live on a golf course but I would love to. Just being "part" of the golf lifestyle is what makes it for me.
I also have noticed that golf communities are usually well kept. My in-laws have been part of several golf communities in Florida and they were all very nice places to live. There was definitely a feeling of belonging to something and I like that.
Some communities are better done than others. I agree, the routing of the golf course should be a primary concern, not the land for the houses. But in a lot of places, both are accomodated nicely. In one place in Naples, Florida that they lived, the biggest concern was not the sound of the drivers, it was keeping the alligators from the water hazards out of the back yard!
I like having a house with a separate garage entrance for my golf cart, and being able to even take the cart to the outskirts of the community to do some quick shopping. In some places your "community maintenance fee" pays for your club membership- so you get free reign of the clubhouse, pool, spa, and several golf courses.
Does life get better than that for the golf-obsessed?
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I think it's a case of each side knowing what they're in for.
As a golfer, you probably know there's housing bordering a course and you're likely to have some additional environmental noises like mowers and yelling kids. That's the price of playing reasonably priced golf in urban areas. If you can't handle it, find a more remote course. People have a right to make some noise at their homes.
As a homeowner, you know you're buying on a course and there will be player noise, an occasional ball in your yard and so on. The trade off is you get a great view of the course.
As a player, the thing I find annoying is when someone puts their house 200-250 yards out on the inside of a dogleg and then posts a sign saying "Damage from golf balls is the responsibility of the golfer..." or "Private Property, do not attempt to retrieve golf balls" I'm sorry, but you knew you were building/buying on a course, having the occasional ball fly your way or player wandering in your back yard is just part of the game. It also why the Plat rules for these developments often don't allow back yard fencing - because players are SUPPOSED to go get their ball back. Really, it seems homeowner's policies for people living on courses should be adjusted for expected glass breakage just like you'd pay a higher rate if you live in a flood plain. You put/bought the house there...it's a reasonable expectation that these events can occur, so quit getting irate when they do. Odds are pretty good the golfer isn't too happy his ball is there either.
It's like building on a lake and putting out a sign that says "Geese are not allowed to crap on my dock." Good luck with that.
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I just don't like it from a player's standpoint - I've played on many nice courses ruined by the look of houses lining the fairways and backing the greens. I can understand the real estate part of it, as well as the pros to the owners.
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^^^^ Very well said Jimmy Mac- I couldn't agree more. Although there are some courses where the houses were there first (I've seen several this way).
In some of these cases, I think it should be mandatory for some sort of netting to be put up or some other method to protect fragile windows. Granted, no one wants to look at netting either, but then don't complain about the game being played.
I know one house with no fence- and they have their backyard chairs set up to watch the golfers go buy on the 9th hole, theater style. They love the entertainment, and it wouldn't surprise me if they occasionally popped on the course for a few holes!
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I lived on two golf courses as a kid and I loved it.
We had our house hit a few times... I guess it was being 220 out on the right side of the fairway that it made it a pretty active landing spot. We had windows broken a couple times, but home owners insurance always covered it.
It's give and take, but clearly worth it. I loved being able to head out the backyard and play two or three holes or putt at night with a spotlight.
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Jimmy Mac,
I agree with you. Having lived in a community it was a constant educational process with homeowners who lived on the course.
Our community derived revenue from the golf course so every golfer who came and played the course provided a tangible benefit to the community. So treating the patrons with respect was imperative because you wanted them to come back. Did this occur, of course not.
Our community bylaws specifically indicated that patrons were allowed to enter your yard to retrieve errant golf shots. Now would all patrons understand and abide by the OB stakes and avoid playing shots from people's back yards? No. Should a marshal or homeowner remind them of the course rules and ask them to move back onto golf course property before playing their next shot? Absolutely.
Did every homeowner whose house was hit threaten litigation against the golf course and community? Always. When shown the precedence and the lack of legal standing they had did they realize that common sense prevails? Of course.
This is like buying a house next to a pig farm and then complaining of the smell. You knew what you were getting into when you bought the home. My favorite is the non-golfer who buys a home in the community about 250 yards down on the right side of hole and then is amazed when house is hit by a golf ball. It never ceases to amaze me. They always ask "Why can't the golfers hit it straight?" I just hand them a golf club and then ask them to give it try.
Off my soap box again.
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I'd prefer a house with a golf course view rather then living next to the fairway. My uncle owns a house next to a tee box and hearing tee shots and conversations go on every day especially on weekends sucks.
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Been there, done that...had a home with a golf course lot. A lot of it depends on the how much money you pay. Cheap housing backing up to not so high quality golf courses tend to have no yard and sit way too close to the course. In other golf course communities, you have decent sized lots which usually equated to higher dollar homes and those homes sit back away from the course more. This is not always the case even with high dollar clubs or courses but tends to be more the norm, or so I find.
As far as noise, safety, and amount of traffic near your yard...it really depends on where your house sits in relation to the tee box or landing areas. Closer to the tee box, you get more noise but less chance of balls flying into your yard or pool. Homes sitting near the average duffer landing area, you will get more balls in your yard or pool. If we are talking a very wooded golf course community, you have a bit more protection from the trees and also the noise. If we are talking desert golf course community...not much protection there from wild shots.
I played a dog track golf course in Las Vegas once that had homes sitting right against the edge of the property line and those homes had the fake stucco finish. There were a bunch of homes there that looked like someone had fired golf balls at their houses. They had numerous golf ball size holes in the stucco.
I prefer to live in a golf course community as I do today but currently I do not live on the golf course. My kids are not small anymore so I would consider moving back to a golf course lot now...just hard to move out of a paid for house and start another mortgage.
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I looked at a few houses on a course while house hunting a few months ago. To me, it wasn't worth paying the premium (seemed to be around 10k) of living on the course to expose myself to errant shots, broken windows, loud groups, and the non-existent backyards. I also have two dogs that bark a lot at strangers, so it probably benefited the course that I stayed off too. I guess the upside is being able to sneak on for a few holes, but it's just as easy to drive to the clubhouse.
My biggest gripe with people who live on courses are those who move in and then hate on all the golfers. You know, the ones with signs in the yard warning about trespassing or will come out screaming if someone hits their house. YOU BOUGHT A HOUSE ON A GOLF COURSE!!! I understand that it would be frustrating to have to replace windows or have to do a search for balls before cutting the grass, but you're the one that bought that place. It can't be that surprising. Put in plexi windows and/or put up a screen. I can understand a sign that says "The yard is OB so please don't hit out of it" or "Keep your cart off the yard". That's just a respect thing that the golfers should honor.
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I played a dog track golf course in Las Vegas once that had homes sitting right against the edge of the property line and those homes had the fake stucco finish. There were a bunch of homes there that looked like someone had fired golf balls at their houses. They had numerous golf ball size holes in the stucco.
Lemme, guess... Los Prados! How those people can live there I'll never know.
There are just a handful of golfing communities in my neck of the woods. Mostly all of them were master planned and some of the houses homes are phenomenal. At Southpointe, for example, you would really have to try hard to hit some of those shacks. Diamond Run is the same way, houses far enough off the track so as not to be in danger.
I would love to retire to a golf community. Nice, paid for, 2 story condo about 50 yards behind a green with sun decks off each level. Close enough to watch the action, but far enough away so that missed shots are coming in dead.
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Locally we had a course that was built and then homes were built around it. Hole #4 (I think) was a dogleg to the right and every person tried to cut the corner because it was easy to do. That left you about a 180 yard shot into the green on a par 5. Then they built the homes and to cut the corner you had to go over a house. Guess what? Everyone pretty much kept going for it. I'd watch as people would put shots off the roof. Ugly stuff.
When I played at Myrtle Beach we played with a group of older gentlemen. The guy told the story about being at his friends house for breakfast that was stationed right off a tee box. 8am and every 8-10 minutes you heard several "F***s" as their drives went where they shouldn't have. He said it was funny the first few times and then the reality of listening to that 365 days out of the year set in on everyone pretty much.
I'd love to retire to a golf community but I'd like to be on the other side of the street!
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I live just off the 12th hole tee box, a par 3 with water on the right side of the green. The homes where I live are set a bit back from the course. The view is wonderful and we love to just watch the golfers go by. And we play too. Anyway, I played a course in Florida where the homes were very close to the fairways and when I went looking for my sliced tee shot, a lady laying face down on a chaise, topless, was pointing under the chaise. It was the kind that had straps so there was space between each strap. As I approached and saw her pointing under the chaise, I asked if she wanted me to go under the chaise to get the ball and she said, if you want the ball you'll have to do that. I crawled under the chaise and got the ball. Plus, the view above, through the straps, was outstanding. This isn't Penthouse--the story ends right there.
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+1 to living near, but not on the golf course. I want to be on the other side of the street. An easy walk to the clubhouse would be great, but I don't want to deal with tee shots coming into my yard.