Golf Shoes?

I live in the damp Pacific NW. I play rounds in all kinds of weather and throughout most of the year.
I have 2 pairs of shoes that I play in and rotate depending on the weather. A pair of Nike Shox that I have had for 3 years and a pair of Adidas Tour 360's that are about 1.5 years old. I take decent care of my shoes. I don't polish them or replace the spikes often, but I do clean them and wash off most of the dirt.
Something very odd has happened with my shoes in the last month. I have played in damp conditions, but not rain. The courses have been pretty soft, but not really muddy. In my last 3 rounds both of my shoes have basically "failed" somehow. With both of my shoes, my socks are soaked by the end of the round and they reak. I have let them air out and pulled the insoles, but they still stink and I think that they have completely lost their waterproofing.
Perhaps I would have guessed the Nikes would get a little wetter since they have a mesh upper, but what is going on with the Adidas? Also, what is going on with the stink? Are courses using some sort of recycled water now? Is the fact that water is getting into the shoe causing the smell when I have never had this before?
Can I do anything to clean the stank out of the shoes? Washing machine? Can I retreat the shoes with a spray waterproofer? Any other suggestions?
Answers:
I've had numerous pairs of Footjoys (Greenjoys, Aqualites and Dryjoys) all of which have 'failed' when it comes to the waterproof claim. I tried using waterproof wax dubbing on the Dryjoys as they were expensive and did not want to chuck them in the bin but it made no difference. I also had a pair of Stuburt that leaked like a seive after only a few months.
I've only been playing golf for 4-5 years and in that time I have had 4 pairs of footjoys, one pair of Stuburts and a pair of Nikes - all of them have failed within a few months when it comes to being waterproof. All in all I don't place much faith in manufacturers claims of the waterproof nature of their shoes. My latest pair are Addidas 360s which seem to be living up to their waterproof claim, but then again it is only the start of the wet season!
My experience is once a shoe loses it waterproofing / fails, you might as well chuck them in the bin.
Answers:
I agree that once a shoe loses it's waterproofing, you might as well throw it away.
However, we (all golfers) should take better care of our shoes before we start wearing them - they cost too much not to. A coat of mink oil or some other waterproofing aid on a pair of shoes right out of the box is one way to ensure that they'll last past the waterproof guarantee date. Cleaning them after each round and an occasional re-coating of the mink oil will really help.
Think of your shoes like your skin - keep them clean, dry and moisturized. Once the cracks develop, you're done!
Answers:
I've had numerous pairs of Footjoys (Greenjoys, Aqualites and Dryjoys) all of which have 'failed' when it comes to the waterproof claim. I tried using waterproof wax dubbing on the Dryjoys as they were expensive and did not want to chuck them in the bin but it made no difference. I also had a pair of Stuburt that leaked like a seive after only a few months.
I've only been playing golf for 4-5 years and in that time I have had 4 pairs of footjoys, one pair of Stuburts and a pair of Nikes - all of them have failed within a few months when it comes to being waterproof. All in all I don't place much faith in manufacturers claims of the waterproof nature of their shoes. My latest pair are Addidas 360s which seem to be living up to their waterproof claim, but then again it is only the start of the wet season!
My experience is once a shoe loses it waterproofing / fails, you might as well chuck them in the bin.
I sympathise mate...but would have sent them straight back to Acushnet.
That reminds me of the time I had a pair of Footjoy Classics that needed a resole but because some one either lost them or just couldn't be bothered to process them they sent me a brand new replacement. RESULT
What I think may have happened is that somehow the waterproof membrane has been punctured; the same thing has happened to a pair of Adidas shoes that I use for practice but they only cost me 25.00
Answers:
I agree that once a shoe loses it's waterproofing, you might as well throw it away.
However, we (all golfers) should take better care of our shoes before we start wearing them - they cost too much not to. A coat of mink oil or some other waterproofing aid on a pair of shoes right out of the box is one way to ensure that they'll last past the waterproof guarantee date. Cleaning them after each round and an occasional re-coating of the mink oil will really help.
Think of your shoes like your skin - keep them clean, dry and moisturized. Once the cracks develop, you're done!
I agree with you buddy, the state of some of my playing partners shoes is a disgrace! EVEN IN SUMMER?
Parade Gloss is great if they are Black or Tan in colour.
Answers:
I agree that once a shoe loses it's waterproofing, you might as well throw it away.
However, we (all golfers) should take better care of our shoes before we start wearing them - they cost too much not to. A coat of mink oil or some other waterproofing aid on a pair of shoes right out of the box is one way to ensure that they'll last past the waterproof guarantee date. Cleaning them after each round and an occasional re-coating of the mink oil will really help.
Think of your shoes like your skin - keep them clean, dry and moisturized. Once the cracks develop, you're done!
I agree with you buddy, the state of some of my playing partners shoes is a disgrace! EVEN IN SUMMER?
Parade Gloss is great if they are Black or Tan in colour.
That's some great advice...probably a great idea to stop wearing white shoes on rainy or wet days. Buy a pair in black or brown so that they can be waxed and made waterproof again for $3.00.
Answers:
Waterproof membranes will inevitibly fail through constant flexing of the shoe, but it shouldn't happen until the shoes have a lot of miles on the clock. Modern leathers are generally treated to be water resistant but still need to be maintained with a decent quality boot/shoe dressing and, depending upon the conditions they typically face, a suitable waterproofing agent on an appropriately regular basis. If the above is carried out and the shoes are looked after, they should last for years and, even when the membrane eventually does fail, you should see little or no loss of waterproof performance if the uppers have been properly maintained.
If a shoe is leaking within a few months, something's drastically wrong and it's likely that the welt has failed. In that case, it's a straight warranty issue.
As an aside, don't use polish (e.g. Kiwi) on a regular basis to maintain shoes. The oils in polish will oversoften the leather over time and the shoes can lose their shape and/or suffer excessive flex marks that look unsightly. A proper boot/shoe dressing that doesn't contain animal fat is far better and will increase the life of the leather without having any negative effects. Polish is fine for bulling footwear but not for regular buffing where the product is worked into the leather.
When it comes to my golf shoes and my work footwear I use LederGris boot dressing on a regular basis and either Graingers G Wax or NikWax waterproofing wax every couple or three months or so. I've still got a pair of FootJoys that are going strong after ten or twelve years of use and a couple of pairs of Alt-Berg and Danner workboots that are still going strong after nigh on 15 years of daily wear and a few re-soles. If you look after leather it lasts forever, no matter how much of a hammering it takes.
Answers:
I believe your Adidas have a 2 year waterproof warranty/guarantee - just take them to the store you bought then and they will provide you with a new pair of adidas as per the warranty
i haven't bought a new pair of shoes in i about 4 years - all mine have failed before the warranty has expired and have had no problems getting replacements from Adidas
Answers:
I pretty much always buy DryJoy shoes, have been doing so since the late 1990s, and they seem to lose their waterproofing after around 4 years or probably 200+ rounds. At that point I downgrade them to "dry weather only" duty.
Answers:
I've never had any problem with any of my golf shoes, especially the Nikes (they last the longest for me and are the most comfortable to me). But, I do spray them down every 5 rounds or so with Silicone Water Guard spray that's available pretty much anywhere that sells shoes or camping supplies. Here's a link to some on some obscure website, but I usually but it inside Walmart.
It restores the waterproofing of any shoes. Just spray it on and let it dry overnight at the least.
Answers:
I live in Vancouver, BC where rain is a constant and so too are the parades of people coming into our shop to claim their 2 year waterproof warranty's. From what I've seen (no matter what the brand), it's typically an issue with the rubber on the outsole cracking or coming loose - where the rubber meets leather, and not the leather itself.
Next time you're at your local golf shop, have a look at the outsole on like a 2010 DryJoy or Synr-G shoe (or something in that price range) and compare it to something of lesser value. The rubber on the outsole is noticeably thicker than others (including the FJ Contour). Although super comfortable and soft, the Contour uses a lesser quality leather and rubber upper and (unless it's fully rubber) will NOT work well in wet weather.
Sprays are only a temporary fix. It's important to allow your shoes to fully dry-out and recover before the next round. The use of shoe-trees in the fall/winter is HUGE! Also consider swapping between pairs (if you have the budget for it).
Answers:
I have several pair of shoes that are 7 years old that still keep my feet dry. I clean them after every wearing but I don't do anything to them other than that. I own a lot of golf shoes, 15 pair, but I also play about 130 rounds of golf every year.
For one, I never leave my golf shoes in my vehicle unless I am taking shoes to work with me to go play somewhere after work. The 100+ degree heat inside a vehicle sitting in the sun will breakdown the glues used to hold the soles to the uppers. Also, I never buy a pair of shoes unless it has at least a 2 year waterproof guarantee.
Most of my shoes are Dryjoys or Callaways.
Answers:
I've had numerous pairs of Footjoys (Greenjoys, Aqualites and Dryjoys) all of which have 'failed' when it comes to the waterproof claim. I tried using waterproof wax dubbing on the Dryjoys as they were expensive and did not want to chuck them in the bin but it made no difference. I also had a pair of Stuburt that leaked like a seive after only a few months.
I've only been playing golf for 4-5 years and in that time I have had 4 pairs of footjoys, one pair of Stuburts and a pair of Nikes - all of them have failed within a few months when it comes to being waterproof. All in all I don't place much faith in manufacturers claims of the waterproof nature of their shoes. My latest pair are Addidas 360s which seem to be living up to their waterproof claim, but then again it is only the start of the wet season!
My experience is once a shoe loses it waterproofing / fails, you might as well chuck them in the bin.
I was pumped when my shoes started leaking. Just means you get new free ones!! Had a pair of contours leak after 9 months, they let me trade in the new countours and upgrade to nike sp-8 couldn't be happier!
Answers:
All shoes wear, not necessarily the uppers, but all the plastic blends and materials wear over time. I just rotate at least 2 pair of shoes, and they last about 2-3 years depending how much I've played. Running shoes are same way. You don't realize how worn out something is til try on new ones.
If you got 4 years out of pair of shoes, you did very well. Even at $150 a pair, that's like one round at nice place a year...kind of like the $30 for SkyCaddie annual subscription. It's less than a dozen balls (if don't have time to shop).
I have found, if kept clean (fertilized is nasty stuff) and use cedar show trees, you can keep looking new, but eventually they just give out. So if you're averaging 3 years, doing well. It's an expense, likely you spiend more on gloves than shoes in a year.
Answers:
I agree that once a shoe loses it's waterproofing, you might as well throw it away.
However, we (all golfers) should take better care of our shoes before we start wearing them - they cost too much not to. A coat of mink oil or some other waterproofing aid on a pair of shoes right out of the box is one way to ensure that they'll last past the waterproof guarantee date. Cleaning them after each round and an occasional re-coating of the mink oil will really help.
Think of your shoes like your skin - keep them clean, dry and moisturized. Once the cracks develop, you're done!
I agree with you buddy, the state of some of my playing partners shoes is a disgrace! EVEN IN SUMMER?
Parade Gloss is great if they are Black or Tan in colour.
That's some great advice...probably a great idea to stop wearing white shoes on rainy or wet days. Buy a pair in black or brown so that they can be waxed and made waterproof again for $3.00.
The only problem I have found is with the wearing of the toe; this being said if you really look after your shoes this shouldn't be anymore hassle than regular maintenance.
I'm really a white shoe fan and get really funny looks when I take the brush out of my golf bag and clean the shoe during and after slightly muddy rounds.
LOL.
Answers:
I have used Kiwi "neutral" color quick polish on all my leather golf shoes for more than 12 years. I have found that if I treat them with two coats when new and then keep them clean and re-treat them every few months they will be waterproof "forever." My old Adidas finally lost it this year after 7 years of use. I have never had this polish degrade the leather in any way. The beauty of the neutral polish is that it is clear and can be applied to any color or multi-colored shoes. Be forwarned that the polish does have a slight yellow tint when dry and white shoes will not look as bright white as they do when new.
Answers:
I have never had this polish degrade the leather in any way.
Good to hear, and some leathers obviously take to polish differently to others, but I've seen people ruin a perfectly good pair of work boots within a year by going at them every day with Kiwi Parade Gloss and a brush in a misguided effort to keep them shiny. The toe cap loses shape and creases and the sides lose all support because the leather loses its shape. Just a heads up for others. The makers of my regular work boots specifically recommend that polishes that contain animal fats aren't used on their products on a regular basis, and a FootJoy rep told me a similar story a year or two back about caring for golf shoes.
I'm with you on the longevity of golf shoes though. The three pairs I rotate between have a combined age of twenty-odd years and are still totally waterproof and looking good.