Aerating the greens?

At my golf course the super didnt aerate the greens at all last year and this year he didnt get to them in the spring ( or should say he wont get to them this spring ).
What can go wrong besides hard as a nail greens?
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Typically, aerification is used to get rid of thatch buildup. Thatch is a layer of dead material between the roots and the green part of the grass. Thatch buildup prevents moisture from getting down to the roots and increases the susceptibility of the turf to disease.
Periodic aerification promotes healthy turf.
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I always thoguth verticutting got rid of thatch.
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Something I found on a blog published by the superintendent at Castle Pines CC in Colorado. Obviously, not every club has the budget that Castle Pines does, but this is just a general explanation of aerification:
"The Benefits of Aerification
Aerification is the mechanical process of creating air space in the soil that promotes a healthy root system.
Turfgrass on Golf courses sustain a significant amount of stress and constant pounding due to cart traffic, foot traffic, and maintenance equipment. By removing cores from the compacted soil, an infusion of air, water, and nutrients enhance the turf by bringing a resurgence of growth, and keeping the turf durable during stressful conditions.
When is Aerification Beneficial?
Aerification, can be beneficial at any time of the year. The most popular times for Aerification are in the spring and fall months.
What Types of Aerification are Available?
-Solid tine: No cores are physically removed from to soil to a depth of 4-6 inches.
-Hollow tine: Cores are physically removed from the soil to depth of 4-6 inches.
-Needle point: These types of tines are extremely small and allow for rapid recovery.
-Deep tine: Can penetrate anywhere from 5-14 inches (depending on soil conditions)
- Hydrojecting: An injection of water through the surface creating aeration holes.
- Graden: This Is a type of vertical aerification that only goes to a depth of 1, but it removes a large amount of surface material.
Aerification should be a part of every Turfgrass maintenance program because it is absolutely necessary for maintaining healthy Turfgrass. Failure to perform this simple maintenance can result in poorly drained soil, thin Turfgrass stands, and continued problems with disease.
The bottom line is that aerification is an necessary evil and with out it high quality turfgrass conditions cannot exist."
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I always thoguth verticutting got rid of thatch.
still need to aerate atleast once
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One thing you will notice is that the greens will get rock hard after awhile if they haven't aerated.
3JACK
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I always thoguth verticutting got rid of thatch.
still need to aerate atleast once
My super aerated but she didn't verticut. The greens are hard and slow... She is an idiot...
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One thing you will notice is that the greens will get rock hard after awhile if they haven't aerated.
3JACK
They are already hard as nail and my handicap has shot up 5 strokes, but my concern is whether or not we might lose our greens?
I have heard that new greens cost around $30k each and as a memeber and a stock holder,that thought scares the hell out of me.
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They are already hard as nail and my handicap has shot up 5 strokes, but my concern is whether or not we might lose our greens?
I have heard that new greens cost around $30k each and as a memeber and a stock holder,that thought scares the hell out of me.
Assuming you have a professional superintendent, I would guess that he would know his job is on the line if he loses the greens. That means there must be a reason why the greens have not been aerated. Why would he risk his job in these tough economic times? Normally the super should know more about the turf than the members.
"hard as nails" greens is subjective. I meet lots of golfers that think greens must be soft that you can throw darts at them. Modern maintenance practices are moving towards more firm conditions that yield healthier turf and better playing surfaces.
I think it is a common annoyance for a super to have to attend to his job and try to deal with all the helpful advice from the members.
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An interesting discussion here. Is your super being held back due to lack of finances? Does he/she have the freedom to perform the required maintenance? Often the problem is not that of the super but of the manager who controls the money or a vocal minority of members who don't want to miss a day of play or a couple of weeks of recovery time.
Aeration actually is also a great opportunity to introduce needed elements during top dressing. When old greens get rock hard it takes years and multiple aerations to bring them back to what should be considered normal.
Often it's about the money.
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They are already hard as nail and my handicap has shot up 5 strokes, but my concern is whether or not we might lose our greens?
I have heard that new greens cost around $30k each and as a memeber and a stock holder,that thought scares the hell out of me.
Assuming you have a professional superintendent, I would guess that he would know his job is on the line if he loses the greens. That means there must be a reason why the greens have not been aerated. Why would he risk his job in these tough economic times? Normally the super should know more about the turf than the members.
"hard as nails" greens is subjective. I meet lots of golfers that think greens must be soft that you can throw darts at them. Modern maintenance practices are moving towards more firm conditions that yield healthier turf and better playing surfaces.
I think it is a common annoyance for a super to have to attend to his job and try to deal with all the helpful advice from the members.
I understand that its tough for supers to listen to joe-shmos such as myself telling them what to do and thats the reason I havent talk to him about it this year at all.All I know is last year around September when we were talkin I asked him if he was going to get to aerate that fall?And his anwser to me was that he had to because he hadnt aerated them the previous spring.Why he had TO was not discussed,only that he had to.Well he never did them last fall ( rained very hard the day we had rented a special aerating equipment ) and so far this spring he hasnt done them and he is not going to I dont think.Something about couple of his help going to jail for stabbing someone over a bad drug deal( yikes ).
Mind you this is a quiet town in southern New Hampshire,but I guess it goes on every where.
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The irony is that the reason courses went to spikeless shoes is that it meant less cost to maintain greens. However since getting rid of spiked shoes courses have had to aerate greens more often.
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An interesting discussion here. Is your super being held back due to lack of finances? Does he/she have the freedom to perform the required maintenance? Often the problem is not that of the super but of the manager who controls the money or a vocal minority of members who don't want to miss a day of play or a couple of weeks of recovery time.
Aeration actually is also a great opportunity to introduce needed elements during top dressing. When old greens get rock hard it takes years and multiple aerations to bring them back to what should be considered normal.
Often it's about the money.
Money is an issue as I am assuming it is with a lot of golf courses these days.Thats why I gathered few of us to volunteered to help in order to keep the cost down.And you are right,few people are concerened now that we are in our tournament season and they dont want to putt on aerated greens ( god forbid they miss out on couple of hundred dollars in proshop credit ).
As far as his freedom goes,he is pretty much have the say so as to when and where things get done as long as he is within budget.But there are always a few know it alls that try to tell him what to do.Of course I am not one of those,my comments are always brilliant,lol.
All kidding aside,I dont tell him what to do and only ask him questions as to what he's plans are and volunteer to help if he needs it.
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The irony is that the reason courses went to spikeless shoes is that it meant less cost to maintain greens. However since getting rid of spiked shoes courses have had to aerate greens more often.
You made that up.
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The irony is that the reason courses went to spikeless shoes is that it meant less cost to maintain greens. However since getting rid of spiked shoes courses have had to aerate greens more often.
Rubbish.
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You have to aerate greens on schedule or the greens will go south. It is a necesary task that must be done.
Everyone hates playing on greens that have been aerated since it is usually done improperly. We have a course that does it properly and my favorite time to play that course is after they have aerated. The greens are the truest rolling that I have ever played. By properly, I mean that they use a fine sand and drag the greens carefully to ensure that all voids are filled.
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The irony is that the reason courses went to spikeless shoes is that it meant less cost to maintain greens. However since getting rid of spiked shoes courses have had to aerate greens more often.
Rubbish.
All the courses I play at aereated twice a year with metal spikes and now once or twice a year after softspikes. to me they are aereating less, or maybe they are doing cores ones and water injection once, which I hardly notice after a week. I have had Supers tell me that the idea of metal spikes helping green quality is a complete urban myth. i know for a fact that the greens I play on today are in generally better condition than most of the greens I played on 15 years ago, for whatever reason.
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The irony is that the reason courses went to spikeless shoes is that it meant less cost to maintain greens. However since getting rid of spiked shoes courses have had to aerate greens more often.
So you think 1/4" spikes do the job of 3" deep cores?
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There is a lot of nonsense being posted here. I am on the green committee for a priviate club with 45 holes of golf plus grass and clay tennis courts. There is ample information about golf course maintenance in general, and the need for aerification in particular, on the USGA and the Golf Course Superintendents Society of Americas websites. There is also the local USGA agronomist and many other experts available to provide an analysis of the course turf conditions.
Deferring course maintenance is like deferring maintenance on a house-- you can pay a little to do regular maintenance (including aerification) or you can wait and pay a lot more. Club members usually do not have a clue about what is necessary, but the course superintendent ceertainly should and can call on the experts I cited. Usually the chairman of the green committee also learns a lot about agronomy. Communication to the members about the procedures needed to maintain good turfgrass and greens is essential, even at the cost of rescheduling events around aerifcation and playing on bumpy greens for a while. If the budget is not adequate at the moment, just be aware that the cost will be higher if regular maintenance is deferred. If the committment or expertise is lacking by the superintendent, general manager or green committee chairman, then these people should be replaced.
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Quote, "The irony is that the reason courses went to spikeless shoes is that it meant less cost to maintain greens. However since getting rid of spiked shoes courses have had to aerate greens more often."
Quote, "Rubbish."
No, Its true as long as you wear these golf shoes....
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Quote, "The irony is that the reason courses went to spikeless shoes is that it meant less cost to maintain greens. However since getting rid of spiked shoes courses have had to aerate greens more often."
Quote, "Rubbish."
No, Its true as long as you wear these golf shoes....
The spikes face which way?
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Metal spikes had some functional value, both for the health of the greens as well as the playability of the greens, since frequent rolling of the greens was necessary with metal spikes. The difference between a rolled green and not rolled is tremendous.
However, once course operators had the chance to decrease maintenance costs by forbidding metal spikes, they took it.
The irony is that the reason courses went to spikeless shoes is that it meant less cost to maintain greens. However since getting rid of spiked shoes courses have had to aerate greens more often.
So you think 1/4" spikes do the job of 3" deep cores?